Tauba Auerbach: Flow Separation
Jul
1
to May 12

Tauba Auerbach: Flow Separation

Flow Separation is a commission by New York-based artist Tauba Auerbach (b. 1981, San Francisco, California), which transforms the historic Fireboat John J. Harvey into a contemporary "dazzle ship." Invented by British painter Norman Wilkinson during World War I, the original dazzle patterns were painted onto ships to optically distort their forms, confusing enemy submarines tracking their distance, direction, and speed. With their geometric shapes, the dazzle designs were heavily indebted to both animal camouflage and avant-garde movements like Cubism, Futurism, and Vorticism. Thousands of vessels were dazzled in the U.K. and U.S., including in New York City at the Brooklyn Navy Yards.

Auerbach is known for her painterly experimentation, often playing with various techniques to explore perception and dimensionality. Her dazzle design draws inspiration from fluid dynamics and the forms found in wake patterns left behind objects as they move through water. Auerbach created her design for the surface of the boat through the process of marbling paper, floating inks on a fluid bath and combing the surface to create various wake patterns before transferring them on to paper. The fireboat also flies a flag diagramming “flow separation” — the phenomenon when areas of fluid in a wake move backwards, creating eddies. By incorporating the movement and behavior of water into the design, Auerbach references how the fireboat travels through water as well as how water moves through the belly of the vessel itself.

2018 marks one hundred years since the end of World War I. Flow Separation artfully threads together notions of innovation, technology, and abstraction, while it also invites us to remember this devastating world war.

The exhibition is curated by Public Art Fund Adjunct Curator, Emma Enderby. READ MORE

Visiting the Exhibition

Locations:
Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 6: July 1 – August 12
Hudson River Park’s Pier 25: August 13 – September 23
Hudson River Park’s Pier 66a: September 24, 2018 – May 12, 2019

Boat Trips & Tours:
Boat trips will take place July 14 – September 23, 2018 on Saturdays and Sundays and last 45-60 minutes; they will start and end at the same location. The capacity of each trip is 75 people, and tickets will be released free of charge to all members of the public at PublicArtFund.org and Fireboat.org starting in mid-June. Reservations are first come, first served.

Starting July 14, the public will also be able to board the boat on weekends to experience the full dazzled design and explore this historic vessel. Flow Separation will be viewable from land seven days a week.

Saturdays
On board visiting hours 12:00-4:00pm
Boat trips: 4:30-5:30pm and 6:00-7:00pm

Sundays
Boat trips: 12:00-1:00pm and 1:30-2:30pm
On board visiting hours: 3:00-7:00pm

*Occasionally, the boat may be away from its pier at an unscheduled time for refueling, cleaning, etc.

text: publicartfund.org

image: Nicholas Knight courtesy of Public Art Fund

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David Wojnarowicz retrospective at Whitney Museum
Jul
13
to Sep 30

David Wojnarowicz retrospective at Whitney Museum

Beginning in the late 1970s, David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) created a body of work that spanned photography, painting, music, film, sculpture, writing, and activism. Largely self-taught, he came to prominence in New York in the 1980s, a period marked by creative energy, financial precariousness, and profound cultural changes. Intersecting movements—graffiti, new and no wave music, conceptual photography, performance, and neo-expressionist painting—made New York a laboratory for innovation. Wojnarowicz refused a signature style, adopting a wide variety of techniques with an attitude of radical possibility. Distrustful of inherited structures—a feeling amplified by the resurgence of conservative politics—he varied his repertoire to better infiltrate the prevailing culture. READ MORE

Image & text: Whitney Museum official website

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Adrian Piper at MoMA
Jul
9
to Jul 21

Adrian Piper at MoMA

Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions 1965–2016

In 1996 Adrian Piper wrote, “It seemed that the more clearly and abstractly I learned to think, the more clearly I was able to hear my gut telling me what I needed to do, and the more pressing it became to do it.” Since the 1960s, this uncompromising artist and philosopher has explored the potential of Conceptual art—work in which the concepts behind the art takes precedence over the physical object—to challenge our assumptions about the social structures that shape the world around us. Often drawing from her personal and professional experiences, Piper’s influential work has directly addressed gender, race, xenophobia, and, more recently, social engagement and self-transcendence.

Bringing together over 290 works, including drawings, paintings, photographs, multimedia installations, videos, and performances, the exhibition offers a rare opportunity to experience her provocative and wide-ranging artwork.  READ MORE

Image & text: moma website

 

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Yoyoi Kusama at Rockaway
Jul
1
to Aug 26

Yoyoi Kusama at Rockaway

MoMA PS1 presents Yayoi Kusama’s (Japan, b. 1929) site-specific installation of Narcissus Garden (1966–present) as the third iteration of Rockaway!, a free public art festival presented with Rockaway Artists Alliance, Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, National Park Service, and Bloomberg Philanthropies in the Gateway National Recreation Area at Fort Tilden. Comprised of 1,500 mirrored stainless steel spheres, Narcissus Garden is on view in a former train garage that dates to the time when Fort Tilden was an active US military base. The mirrored metal surfaces reflect the industrial surroundings of the now-abandoned building, drawing attention to Fort Tilden’s history as well as the devastating damage inflicted on many buildings in the area by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Narcissus Garden was first presented in 1966, when Kusama staged an unofficial installation and performance at the 33rd Venice Biennale. The silver spheres, originally made from plastic, were installed on the lawn in front of the Italian Pavilion, reflecting the landscape of the exhibition grounds. Kusama herself stood among them, barefoot and dressed in a gold kimono, alongside yard signs inscribed with the words “Narcissus Garden, Kusama” and “Your Narcissism for Sale.” Throughout the opening day of the exhibition, Kusama remained in the installation, tossing the spheres in the air and offering to sell them to visitors for 1,200 lire (approximately $2) each. The action, which was viewed both as self-promotion and a critique on the commercialization of contemporary art, would later be seen as a pivotal moment in Kusama’s career as she transitioned from installation toward the radical, politically charged public performances that would be the focus of her work in the late 1960s in New York City. READ MORE

Image & text : moma.org

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"This is Not a Prop" at David Zwirner 19th St, Chelsea
Jun
27
to Aug 3

"This is Not a Prop" at David Zwirner 19th St, Chelsea

David Zwirner is pleased to present This Is Not a Prop at the gallery’s 525 and 533 West 19th Street locations in New York. The exhibition includes work by Alex Da Corte, Jonathas de Andrade, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jonah Groeneboer, Gordon Hall, Hannah Levy, Donald Moffett, Paulo Nazareth, Elle Pérez, Oren Pinhassi, Christina Quarles, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Wolfgang Tillmans, and Franz West. READ MORE

Image & text: David Zwirner official website

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Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination exhibition at the Met 5th Ave
May
10
to Oct 8

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination exhibition at the Met 5th Ave

The Costume Institute's spring 2018 exhibition—at The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters—features a dialogue between fashion and medieval art from The Met collection to examine fashion's ongoing engagement with the devotional practices and traditions of Catholicism. READ MORE

Image & Text: Met official website

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Downtown Culture Walk by SoHo Arts Network
Apr
28
12:00 PM12:00

Downtown Culture Walk by SoHo Arts Network

Join the Downtown Culture Walk this Saturday, April 28 !

| Noon – 6pm |
The Downtown Culture Walk is a self-guided walking tour presented by the SoHo Arts Network (SAN), highlighting the non-profit art spaces in the SoHo and downtown neighborhoods and for which NY Artmaps did the map :)

Pick up maps at the participating locations or view the Art in America guide via link bellow for walkthroughs, talks, open hours, and other programming offered that day for free or reduced admission.

View the ONLINE MAP AND GUIDE HERE 

 

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Eduardo Navaro at The Drawing Center
Apr
6
to Apr 22

Eduardo Navaro at The Drawing Center

The Drawing Center has commissioned Into Ourselves, a new short-term project by Argentinian artist Eduardo Navarro for The Lab which will open on April 6, 2018. Navarro will produce a new series of edible drawings, inspired by quantum physics––specifically the “holographic principle,” which describes how information in the universe can only be scrambled but never destroyed.

The drawings will be placed on shelves with red “heat lamps.” During the course of the exhibition, a soup will be made that will dissolve the drawings to make them digestible. Into Ourselves also explores the idea of shifting our understanding of aesthetic primacy away from the eye and the world of ideas to metabolism, and the stomach. READ MORE

Photo & text: Drawing Center website

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Being: New Photography 2018 at MoMA
Mar
22
to Aug 19

Being: New Photography 2018 at MoMA

Every two years, MoMA’s celebrated New Photography exhibition series presents urgent and compelling ideas in recent photography and photo-based art. This year’s edition, Being, asks how photography can capture what it means to be human.

At a time when questions about the rights, responsibilities, and dangers inherent in being represented—and in representing others—are being debated around the world, the works featured in Being call attention to assumptions about how individuals are depicted and perceived. Many challenge the conventions of photographic portraiture, or use tactics such as masking, cropping, or fragmenting to disorient the viewer. In others, snapshots or found images are taken from their original context and placed in a new one to reveal hidden stories. While some of the works might be considered straightforward representations of individuals, others do not include images of the human body at all. Together, they explore how personhood is expressed today, and offer timely perspectives on issues of privacy and exposure; the formation of communities; and gender, heritage, and psychology. READ MORE

Photo & text: MoMA website

Image caption: Stephanie Syjuco. Cargo Cults: Head Bundle. 2013-16

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Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now) at Met Breuer
Mar
21
to Jul 22

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now) at Met Breuer

Seven hundred years of sculptural practice—from fourteenth-century Europe to the global present—are examined anew in this groundbreaking exhibition. Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now) explores narratives of sculpture in which artists have sought to replicate the literal, living presence of the human body. On view exclusively at The Met Breuer, this major international loan exhibition of about 120 works draws on The Met's rich collections of European sculpture and modern and contemporary art, while also featuring a selection of important works from national and international museums and private collections. READ MORE

Photo & text : Met Museum website

 

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Zoe Leonard: Survey at Whitney Museum of American Art
Mar
2
to Jun 10

Zoe Leonard: Survey at Whitney Museum of American Art

New York–based artist Zoe Leonard (b. 1961) is among the most critically acclaimed artists of her generation.  Over the past three decades, she has produced work in photography and sculpture that has been celebrated for its lyrical observations of daily life coupled with a rigorous, questioning attention to the politics and conditions of image making and display.           

 Zoe Leonard: Survey is the first large-scale overview of the artist’s work in an American museum. The exhibition looks across Leonard’s career to highlight her engagement with a range of themes, including the history of photography, gender and sexuality, loss and mourning, migration, displacement, and the urban landscape. More than it focuses on any particular subject, however, Leonard’s work slowly and reflectively calibrates vision and form. Using repetition, subtle changes of perspective, and shifts of scale, Leonard draws viewers into an awareness of the meanings behind otherwise familiar images or objects. A counter-example to the speed and disposability of image culture today, Leonard’s photographs, sculptures and installations ask the viewer to reengage with how we see. READ MORE

 

Photo & Text: Whitney Museum of American Art Website

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Peter Hujar: Speed of Life at The Morgan Library & Museum
Mar
1
6:30 PM18:30

Peter Hujar: Speed of Life at The Morgan Library & Museum

The life and art of Peter Hujar (1934–1987) were rooted in downtown New York. Private by nature, combative in manner, well-read, and widely connected, Hujar inhabited a world of avant-garde dance, music, art, and drag performance. His mature career paralleled the public unfolding of gay life between the Stonewall uprising in 1969 and the AIDS crisis of the 1980s.

In his loft studio in the East Village, Hujar focused on those who followed their creative instincts and shunned mainstream success. He made, in his words, “uncomplicated, direct photographs of complicated and difficult subjects,” immortalizing moments, individuals, and subcultures passing at the speed of life.

Peter Hujar: Speed of Life—on view at the Morgan from January 26 through May 20—presents one hundred and forty photographs by this enormously important and influential artist. Drawn from the extensive holdings of his work at the Morgan and from nine other collections, the show and its catalog follow Hujar from his beginnings in the mid-1950s to his central role in the East Village art scene three decades later. READ MORE

Photo & Text:  The Morgan Library & Museum Website

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2018 Triennial: Songs for Sabotage at New Museum
Feb
13
to Apr 27

2018 Triennial: Songs for Sabotage at New Museum

Together, the artists in “Songs for Sabotage” propose a kind of propaganda, engaging with new and traditional media in order to reveal the built systems that construct our reality, images, and truths. The exhibition amounts to a call for action, an active engagement, and an interference in political and social structures, and brings together works across mediums by approximately thirty artists from nineteen countries, the majority of whom are exhibiting in the United States for the first time.

“Songs for Sabotage” explores interventions into cities, infrastructures, and the networks of everyday life, proposing objects that might create common experience. The exhibition takes as a given that these structures are linked to the entrenched powers of colonialism and institutionalized racism that magnify inequity. Through their distinct approaches, the artists in “Songs for Sabotage” offer models for dismantling and replacing the political and economic networks that envelop today’s global youth. Invoking the heightened role of identity in today’s culture, they take on the technological, economic, and material structures that stand in the way of collectivity. READ MORE

 

Photo & Text: New Museum Website

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Tarsila do Amaral at MoMA
Feb
11
to Jun 3

Tarsila do Amaral at MoMA

 Though she is widely celebrated in her native country, this is the first exhibition in the United States devoted exclusively to Tarsila’s groundbreaking art. Featuring over 100 works, including paintings, drawings, sketchbooks, photographs, and historical documents drawn from collections across Latin America, Europe, and the US, Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil is a rare opportunity to explore the work of this daring modernist. READ MORE HERE

Text & Image: MoMA website

Image Caption: Tarsila do Amaral. Abaporu. 1928

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Tania Bruguera at MoMA
Feb
10
to Mar 11

Tania Bruguera at MoMA

Artist and activist Tania Bruguera (Cuban, born 1968) investigates the impact of state power in her installation Untitled (Havana, 2000). Initially conceived for the 7th Havana Biennial in 2000, the work was first presented in the Cabaña Fortress, a military bunker used as a jail for prisoners of conscience during the Cuban Revolution. From colonial times through the early years of the Revolution, the counterrevolutionary opposition was tortured and executed by firing squad at the Fortress. Combining milled sugarcane, video footage of Fidel Castro, and live performance presented in near-total darkness, Untitled (Havana, 2000) evokes the contradictions of life in the wake of the Cuban Revolution. The work, which was on view for mere hours in Havana before being shut down by the Cuban government, embodies Bruguera’s complex relationship to authority. READ MORE HERE

Text & Image: MoMA website

Image caption: Tania Bruguera, Untitled (Havana, 2000). Video Still

 

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Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away at Guggenheim Museum
Feb
9
to May 9

Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away at Guggenheim Museum

Danish artist Danh Vo (b. 1975, Bà Rịa, Vietnam) dissects the public forces and private desires that define individual experience. His work addresses sweeping cultural and political themes, but refracts them through intimate personal narratives—what the artist calls “the tiny diasporas of a person’s life.” Seen together in this survey exhibition, the sculptures, photographs, and works on paper that he has created over the past fifteen years circle a central paradox: that the self is plural and inherently fluid, yet decisively shaped by larger power structures. READ MORE

Photo & Text: Guggenheim Museum website

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Stephen Shore at 303 Gallery, Chelsea
Jan
11
to Feb 17

Stephen Shore at 303 Gallery, Chelsea

Widely recognized as one of the most significant and influential artists of our time, Stephen Shore has principally restructured the language of photography. Tapping into popular culture and a specific type of American vernacular imagery, Shore has inspired generations of artists working with the photographic medium to find poetry and order in the mundane. His seminal bodies of work "Uncommon Places" and "American Surfaces" helped usher the relevance of American art in the postwar era, and remain canonical studies in photography's potential to classify, conjure, and meditate on the social legacy of modernity. READ MORE HERE

Text & Image: 303 Gallery website

Image Caption: Stephen Shore, Madison River, Norris, Montana, August 2017. Pigment Print. 64 x 48 inches. Edition of 3, with 2 APs

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Katherine Bernhardt solo show "Greene" at Canada, LES
Jan
5
to Feb 11

Katherine Bernhardt solo show "Greene" at Canada, LES

Green is Katherine Bernhardt’s fifth solo show with the gallery and finds the artist oscillating between optimism and dread. Bernhardt uses green to allude to jungles, money, grass, smoggy air pollution, barf, and envy. Green also refers to Soylent Green the classic dystopian movie, which tells the story of environmental collapse and moral decline. The paintings depict robotic killer bees, huge avocados, Garfield, bottles of Coke, Nike swooshes and manufactured crap that is contrasted with the delights of nature. Bernhardt has also made a series of painted wood sculptures which augment and extend her painted forms; they are hybrids of flora, fauna and furniture painted tropical day-glo pink. READ MORE HERE
 

Photo & text: Canada Website

Image caption: Direct Flight, 2017. Acrylic and spray paint on canvas. 114 x 318 in (289.56 x 807.72 cm)

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Anselm Kiefer at The Met Breuer
Dec
13
to Apr 8

Anselm Kiefer at The Met Breuer

Opening December 13, Provocations: Anselm Kiefer at The Met Breuer will feature 34 works on paper and one painting by the German artist, all drawn from The Met collection. The exhibition will span the artist's nearly 50-year career and will be on view at The Met Breuer through April 8, 2018. READ MORE HERE

Photo & text: Met Breuer Website

Image Caption: Anselm Kiefer (German, born 1945). Winter Landscape, 1970. Watercolor, gouache, and graphite on paper. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Denise and Andrew Saul Fund, 1995. ©Anselm Kiefer

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Carolee Schneemann at MoMA PS1
Dec
2
to Mar 11

Carolee Schneemann at MoMA PS1

"MoMA PS1 presents the first comprehensive retrospective of Carolee Schneemann, spanning the artist’s prolific six-decade career. As one of the most influential artists of the second part of the 20th century, Schneemann’s pioneering investigations into subjectivity, the social construction of the female body, and the cultural biases of art history have had significant influence on subsequent generations of artists. Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting begins with rarely seen examples of the artist’s early paintings of the 1950s and their evolution into assemblages made in the 1960s, which integrated objects, mechanical elements, and modes of deconstruction. In the late 1960s Schneemann began positioning her own body within her work, performing the roles of “both image and image-maker.” As a central protagonist of the New York downtown avant-garde community, she explored hybrid artistic forms culminating in experimental theater events. The exhibition considers Schneemann’s oeuvre within the context of painting by tracing the developments that led to her groundbreaking innovations in performance, film, and installation in the 1970s, as well as her increasingly spatialized multimedia installations from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s"

Photo & text MoMA.org: READ MORE

Image: Carolee Schneemann. Eye Body: 36 Transformative Actions for Camera. 1963/2005. Eighteen gelatin silver prints. 24 x 20" each (61 x 50.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist. © 2017 Carolee Schneemann. Courtesy the artist, P.P.O.W, and Galerie Lelong, New York. Photos: Erró

 

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David Hockney at Metropolitan Musuem
Nov
27
to Feb 25

David Hockney at Metropolitan Musuem

"For nearly 60 years, David Hockney (British, born 1937) has pursued a singular career with a love for painting and its intrinsic challenges. This major retrospective—the exhibition's only North American venue—honors the artist in his 80th year by presenting his most iconic works and key moments of his career from 1960 to the present."

Photo & text metmuseum.org : READ MORE

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"Unholding" at Artist Space, Soho
Nov
19
to Jan 21

"Unholding" at Artist Space, Soho

Artists of Indigenous heritage have, for many decades in New York City, developed their practices in self-initiated contexts while endeavoring to extend the reach and visibility of their work to broader publics. Even as progressive art discourse celebrated an emergent multicultural outlook in the late 1980s, narratives around Native American art, culture, and experience remained simplified. Inspired by curator and artist Lloyd Oxendine’s American Art Gallery, founded in SoHo in the early 1970s, institutions such as the American Indian Community House (AICH) and American Indian Artists Inc. (AMERINDA) opened urban spaces for Indigenous representation which thrived outside of conventional value systems. Cultural and operational experimentation abounded and the roles of artist, curator, historian and activist were regularly blurred: G. Peter Jemison, whose early paintings were exhibited by Oxendine, served as the first gallery director of the AICH, while Jolene Rickard, whose photographs complicate separations between Native and American iconographies, is an acclaimed curator and a leading scholar in Indigenous visual history. READ MORE HERE

Photo & text: Artist Space Website

Image caption: Adam and Zack Khalil. Still from INAATE/SE/ [it shines a certain way. to a
certain place./it flies. falls./]
, 2016

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Brancusi at The Guggenheim
Nov
14
to Apr 14

Brancusi at The Guggenheim

In gallery space devoted to the permanent collection, the Guggenheim is showcasing its rich holdings of the work of Constantin Brancusi (1876–1957). In the early decades of the twentieth century, Brancusi produced an innovative body of work that altered the trajectory of modern sculpture. During this period, Brancusi lived and worked in Paris, then a thriving artistic center where many modernist tenets were being developed and debated. He became an integral part of these conversations both through his relationships with other artists, such as Marcel Duchamp, Fernand Léger, Amedeo Modigliani, and Henri Rousseau, and through his own pioneering work. His aspiration to express the essence of his subjects through simplified forms and his engagement with non–Western European artistic traditions led to new stylistic approaches. In addition, his mode of presentation, which equally emphasized sculpture and base and in which works were shown in direct relation to one another, instead of as independent entities, introduced new ways of thinking about the nature of the art object. READ MORE


Image & text: Guggenheim Website

Image caption: Installation view of "Guggenheim Collection: Brancusi" at Guggenheim, New York.

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Douglas Gordon at Gagosian 21st St, Chelsea
Nov
14
to Feb 3

Douglas Gordon at Gagosian 21st St, Chelsea

Gagosian is pleased to present “back and forth and forth and back,” an exhibition of key films and videos by Douglas Gordon, including 24 Hour Psycho Back and Forth and To and Fro (2008), as well as a selection of video monitor works.

In his projections, installations, photographs, text works, performances, and more, Gordon investigates collective memory and selfhood, whether divided, fragmented, or dissolved altogether. His interest in temporal manipulation is especially evident in his films and videos; using his own work and that of others as raw material, he distorts time in order to disorient and challenge. READ MORE HERE

Photo & text: Gagosian Website

Image caption: "Douglas Gordon: back and forth and forth and back," installation view at Gagosian West 21st Street, New York. Artwork © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017. Psycho, 1960, USA. Directed and Produced by Alfred Hitchcock. Distributed by Paramount Pictures © Universal City Studios.

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Laura Owens at Whitney Museum
Nov
10
to Feb 4

Laura Owens at Whitney Museum

"For more than twenty years, Los Angeles–based artist Laura Owens has pioneered an innovative approach to painting that has made her one of the most influential artists of her generation. Her bold and experimental work challenges traditional assumptions about figuration and abstraction, as well as the relationships among avant-garde art, craft, pop culture, and technology.

This mid-career survey, the most comprehensive of Owens’s work to-date, will feature approximately 60 paintings from the mid-1990s until today. The exhibition will highlight her significant strides over the past few years, showing how the early work sets the stage for gripping new paintings and installations".

Photo & text Whitney.org : READ MORE

image: Laura Owens, Untitled, 2000. Acrylic, oil, and graphite on canvas, 72 x 66 1/2 in. (182.9 x 168.9 cm). Collezione Giuseppe Iannaccone, Milan © Laura Owens

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Yayoi Kusama at David Zwirner, Chelsea & UES
Nov
2
to Dec 16

Yayoi Kusama at David Zwirner, Chelsea & UES

David Zwirner is pleased to present two major concurrent exhibitions of recent work by Yayoi Kusama on view across three gallery spaces in New York: Festival of Life at 525 and 533 West 19th Street in Chelsea and Infinity Nets at the recently opened space on 34 East 69th Street on the Upper East Side. The exhibitions will feature sixty-six paintings from her iconic My Eternal Soul series, new large-scale flower sculptures, a polka-dotted environment, and two Infinity Mirror Rooms in the Chelsea locations, and a selection of new Infinity Nets paintings uptown.  READ MORE and PLAN YOUR VISIT HERE

Photo & Text: David Zwirner website

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Thomas Hirschhorn "De-Pixelation" at Gladstone Gallery on 21st St, Chelsea
Oct
28
to Jan 13

Thomas Hirschhorn "De-Pixelation" at Gladstone Gallery on 21st St, Chelsea

Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present DE-PIXELATION, an exhibition of new work from Thomas Hirschhorn’s Pixel-Collage series. Over the last two years, Hirschhorn has embarked on this deeply personal, political and socially-engaged body of work that explores the limitations and deceitfulness of imagery found throughout popular culture and the media. Employing a mix of collaging techniques, Hirschhorn’s work from the Pixel-Collage series calls into question the legitimacy of imagery that has been altered to protect the viewer from unpleasant depictions of gruesome human suffering and violence. This exhibition marks the conclusion of the Pixel-Collage series. READ MORE HERE

Photo & Image: Gladstone Website

 

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"Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting" at MoMA PS1
Oct
23
to Nov 11

"Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting" at MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 presents the first comprehensive retrospective of Carolee Schneemann, spanning the artist’s prolific six-decade career. As one of the most influential artists of the second part of the 20th century, Schneemann’s pioneering investigations into subjectivity, the social construction of the female body, and the cultural biases of art history have had significant influence on subsequent generations of artists. Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting begins with rarely seen examples of the artist’s early paintings of the 1950s and their evolution into assemblages made in the 1960s, which integrated objects, mechanical elements, and modes of deconstruction. In the late 1960s Schneemann began positioning her own body within her work, performing the roles of “both image and image-maker.” As a central protagonist of the New York downtown avant-garde community, she explored hybrid artistic forms culminating in experimental theater events. The exhibition considers Schneemann’s oeuvre within the context of painting by tracing the developments that led to her groundbreaking innovations in performance, film, and installation in the 1970s, as well as her increasingly spatialized multimedia installations from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. READ MORE

Photo & Text: MoMA PS1 Website

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Cathy Wilke at MoMA PS1
Oct
23
to Mar 11

Cathy Wilke at MoMA PS1

Cathy Wilkes (Irish, b. 1966) in New York. The largest exhibition of the artist’s work to date, Cathy Wilkes features approximately 50 works from public and private collections throughout Europe and North America as well as new pieces created for the show, offering a broad view of Wilkes’s work since 2004. The exhibition is organized in conjunction with Wilkes’s receipt of the first Maria Lassnig Prize, awarded by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in 2016.

Over more than two decades, Cathy Wilkes has created a body of work that engages with the rituals of life, combining paintings, drawings, sculptures and objects both found and altered. Regularly employing quotidian products and residual materials drawn from her domestic life and environment in Glasgow, Wilkes’s installations connect the banalities of daily existence to larger archetypes of birth, marriage, child-rearing, and death. This combination of the personal and universal parallels a meditation at the heart of her work, in which Wilkes’s art enacts an exercise in empathy, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of artmaking. READ MORE

Photo & text: MoMA PS1 Website

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Barbara Hammer "Truant: Photographs, 1970–1979" at Company, LES
Oct
22
to Nov 26

Barbara Hammer "Truant: Photographs, 1970–1979" at Company, LES

Throughout the 1970s, filmmaker Barbara Hammer toured the United States, Africa, and Europe, making film after film about women and the lesbian experience, neither of which had seldom been seen by a woman, for women on screen before. She made a slew of now-legendary experimental films, including Sisters! (1973), Dyketactics (1974), Multiple Orgasm (1976), Sappho (1978), and Double Strength (1978), more or less inventing lesbian cinema at a time when such material had largely been relegated to the pornographic imagination of male artists and filmmakers. During this prolific period, Hammer photographed her travels, her lovers, moments of community and kinship between her collaborators on set, private and public performances, friends, strangers. In these photographs, most of which have never been exhibited before, Hammer’s work explodes traditional notions of female sexuality by showing it for what it is: complex, messy, abstract, human. READ MORE

Phoot & Text: Company Gallery Website

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Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait at MoMA
Oct
16
to Jan 28

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait at MoMA

Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait explores the prints, books, and creative process of the celebrated sculptor Louise Bourgeois (1911–2010). Bourgeois’s printed oeuvre, a little-known aspect of her work, is vast in scope and comprises some 1,200 printed compositions, created primarily in the last two decades of her life but also at the beginning of her career, in the 1940s. The Museum of Modern Art has a prized archive of this material, and the exhibition will highlight works from the collection along with rarely seen loans. A special installation will fill the Museum’s Marron Atrium. READ MORE

Photo & Text: MoMA Website

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